Just So You Know, Nobody Knows What They Are Doing

I don’t really know the age group that reads my posts. But, in case you are a young person like me—and you feel stressed out and worried and anxious about your future—I have something to tell you.

People have no idea what they are doing.

Your parents. Your teachers. People on the street. They only know what they bothered to learn. People are talented and knowledgeable, sure—but on only certain things.

Something no one has worked out perfectly is how to be a human on earth. Continue reading

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Push–Can I Automate That?

I like to automate. When I hit a problem with timing or effort, the question becomes: “Can I automate that? Can I make technology do that for me?” I am a transhumanist: it’s not odd I think that way, but what is funny is how often the answer is a resounding YES to those questions.

I guess the world is catching up to the proposed futures of the past. Smart plugs make my light turn on by my schedule. My scale records my weight for me. If I can make something give alerts or similar when events occur, then I am all for it.

Now, you might call me lazy. You might call me spoiled. You’re right on the first one, possibly right on the second. After all, I am a white male, cis-gendered, heterosexual living in America (also a little left-leaning, if you could not tell from that tongue twister), so I get access to some of the best stuff in the world—and I can get it delivered to my door.

And that’s spoiled.

That’s lazy. Continue reading

Some Ill-Informed Futuristic Predicitons

Who said having in-depth knowledge of something is a necessary step to talking about it? And, yes, that’s satire, but, even if it makes me hypocritical, I’m doing it anyway. Because, it’s a new year, and the technological singularity is a thing that exists and will only exist more: so, I figured I’d go and tally up some technological innovations I expect to come into a more prominent place this year of 2018. Continue reading

The Future Will Be Awesome

I’ve experienced many art forms that present all the bad ways technology will fuck us up, kill us all, or enslave mankind.

And, yet, even though I’ve seen all of this, even though I can perceive how we might annihilate our planet, I am weirdly optimistic about the future. Continue reading

Happy Birthday To Me

Okay, time to admit something…I’m young. I don’t know if my readers, you guys, knew that about me—but I’m in my early twenties. Specifically, I’m now 22. I don’t really say that much or make many references to my age because I’ve found that people are less likely to take me seriously, especially as a professional writer, when they realize how young I am. Continue reading

Microfiction: Moving In, Moving Out

Wednesday recalls moving in and remembers the moment she wanted to move out. She sees them both as the last of the boxes leave the room. All over the world Wednesday’s gone, seen, and done so much. But, still, each house, no matter how small a time spent there, was a memory, and nothing closes a memory like the last item out of the room.

“I’ll miss it here,” she says and knows she is lying and telling the truth all at the same time. Continue reading

Flash Fiction: Was She There?

The ceiling spins, and the fan stays so damn still. My stomach is a churning, burning, mass of something or other that is not bile but tastes a heck of a lot like it. My legs do not go the right way, not the way they should be—the muscles relaxed to the point I’m unsure I can stand. Continue reading

Microfiction: Bagels And Cream Cheese

“They say the percentage of redheads in this country is really tiny,” Hebert said to the woman as she handed over the cheap bagel, the near-it’s-expiration-date cream cheese tube, and the coffee with a price in the two digits.

“Is that so?” she said, sounding bored. “Well, I guess that’s cool. Enjoy your food.” Continue reading

Flash Fiction: Crime Scene (Part 1 of 3)

I haven’t felt squeamish in years. So, you must understand my confusion when I came upon the newest scene of death and dismemberment and something lurched in my stomach. A few thoughts went through my head as I clutched with one hand on my gut. I assumed the sponge steak I had made had been bad or something of that ilk. That I had failed to drink enough sim-water.

Only after another second I realized the truth: I was grossed out, disgusted. My partner did not look at me as she passed by my frozen figure into the living room, and so I did not have to explain my situation as she kneeled next to what used to be a person. Continue reading

Microfiction: Weapon-Grade Buttons

A family of four did not survive for even four seconds. The first rev of the machine gun spewed death so fast they were not even aware that their flesh had jolted to pieces.

Innocent? Is anyone innocent?

Ken pressed the button on his console. He flicked a switch; he spun a few dials. He pressed another button. Continue reading

Microfiction: Desk Setup

The computer connected to the phone. A link cable, pushed into the side, made sure that the data went into the laptop, and posted to all the social mediums on the planet. The images of one life added to the collective of the rest. Giving some understanding of who owned the picture—perhaps the only understanding available. Continue reading

Flash Fiction: A Picture’s Worth

“No, come on, will you please look at this?”

If the term cold shoulder was literal, she would resemble an ice princess. As it stands, she’s wearing a fire red shirt that hugged her upper body as hard as I want to most of the time.

“No, Kevin. We’re not doing this. That machine…what you do…it’s not healthy. When did you even last go outside?”

Trying to not let her notice, I roll down my jacket sleeve and look at my skin. If light hit that, I’d probably blind someone.

“Well…it’s been awhile, I’ll admit. But you know how important this device is to me.”

“Yes. Yes I do.” She keeps her back to me, and lets out a long sigh. “Important is definitely the right word for it. I remember when other things were important to you.” Continue reading

Collin Pearman: Three Pathways To The Future Of Science Fiction

So, a little more than a month ago, I wrote a guest blog post for my good friend Collin Pearman, author of the excellent book “A Timeless Abandon“. In return, he wrote an article not only responding to my own, but going further on the topic.

This my friends, is that article.

Three Pathways to the Future of Science Fiction

As he often does, Brandon Scott got me thinking. Recently, I had the honor of having him write a guest post for my blog, on the future of science fiction as he’d like to see it. His one word for what he’d like to see? MORE. And he’s right, of course. More is what we most certainly need. But how? I present to you three pathways (principles?) to making this future a reality. First and foremost, we need to actually care about the future of sci-fi. Continue reading